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Who is dating plies

who is dating plies-64

FDLE WILL, HOWEVER, RELEASE THE LAST FOUR DIGITS OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER.

who is dating plies-39who is dating plies-89

However, it’s been documented in previous articles on the “realest” street scribe in Hip Hop today that Plies’ time was mostly consumed in the mid-to-late ‘90’s attending college at either Miami University in Oxford, Ohio – where he reportedly played on the football team – or the University of South Florida in Tampa, or both schools (there are conflicting reports regarding his collegiate career, and DX was unable to substantiate any as of press time).According to reports, members of the rapper’s entourage, including his older brother, Ronell “Big Gates” Lavatte, pulled out guns and fired in the club after Plies, who’s performance was running long, became angry when his microphone was cut off so that Lil Boosie could begin to perform.Plies’ career guide/older brother, and another man, Troy Denard Carnegie, were both charged with attempted murder, each accused of firing at least three rounds in the club that night.And while crime has clearly hovered around the rapper’s day-to-day life in recent years, impacting him indirectly via the aforementioned incarceration of his older brother and the recent arrest of his manager [click to read], first person accounts of criminal activities on Plies’ part are conspicuously scarce in his raw rhymes.Instead, sympathetic laments on the cruelties experienced by family members and friends at the hands of an oftentimes merciless justice system, and not his own personal experiences, can be found in most of his material.In addition to fallacious statements in song, Plies has also produced a contemptuous image for himself on the screen, including his portrayal as a high rollin’ drug dealer in the video clip for “Worth Goin Fed Fo” [click to watch] have shone a new light on the exaggerated, and in some instances completely fabricated, biographies crafted by too many of today’s Hip Hop artists.

These personal “stories” highlight phantom criminal backgrounds in an attempt to boost so-called “street cred” with fans who often are not living such lives and are therefore attracted to these tall tales of Tony Montana-esque (or in Plies’ case, O-Dog-style) criminal prowess and/or success.

The 32-year-old was arrested for the first time at the age of 29 on April 12, 2006 for the misdemeanor charge of resisting an officer without violence.

The latter of his two adult arrests came during a well-publicized shooting at a Gainesville, Florida nightclub after a Plies performance on July 2, 2006.

These fake personas proving to be alarmingly irresponsible when absorbed by the equally impressionable, but oftentimes far more impoverished, segment of the Hip Hop audience who believe with a dangerous literalism that they too can lead lives of crime ala fictional movie criminals or equally fictional rap criminals and yet in still eventually become an unimprisoned Hip Hop celebrity.

And while fabricated bios are nothing new to Hip Hop, even claiming the careers of some artists (see Vanilla Ice), unlike most emcees of yesteryear like the aforementioned Tupac, who balanced his occasionally outlandish claims of dope dealing and gang banging with cautionary tales of the pitfalls involved in a life of crime (see “Shorty Wanna Be A Thug,” “Young Niggaz,” etc), Plies seems more oblivious to maintaining any artistic responsibility, instead recklessly crafting a seemingly strategic image and seeking to capitalize on fraudulent claims of criminal activity all the while declaring to be Hip Hop’s undiluted truth teller, personifying all that is “real.” It’s now abundantly apparent that Plies has forsaken being fully forthright with his fans, failing to make the crucial distinction that those around him, and not he, are the real victims of our nation’s often flawed justice system, and that he is merely observing and reporting their experiences within a life of crime and not his own.

But there are the occasional past tense references to what appear to be claims of his own criminal activity.